International History and Politics Podcasts

The International History and Politics Podcasts present students with a unique opportunity to engage in the practical application of their research or communicate it to a non-specialist audience. The podcasts are integrated into the curriculum of several International Historyand Politics and interdisciplinary master (MINT) courses. They aim to encourage students to use social network platforms to popularise their findings. This initiative is intended to encourage students to work on their oral skills, engage with their peers and undertake independent and collaborative work, including with other Geneva institutions.  This exercise emphasises the importance of diverse possibilities for communicating historical research and demonstrating its enduring relevance to current affairs. 

Musée International de la Croix Rouge: Photo Videocast

 

 

The MICR videocast takes a look at two photos of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in the Korean War, provided by the Musée International de la Croix Rouge. This videocast is a close examination of photographic analysis and the process by which historians use incomplete historical sources to tell a story."

This project was sponsored by the Musée International de la Croix Rouge and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was produced by Odile Blanc, Patrick Gregory, and Chatterjee Saheli in the Spring semester of 2020.
 

League of Nations & the Aland Islands

The First World War created new opportunities for people across the world to clamour for self-determination and be heard on an international stage. In this podcast we discuss the Aland Islands dispute and its resolution by the League of Nations as part of this larger post-war moment.

This project was sponsored by the League of Nations Archive and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was produced by Christian Jones, Cristoph Buhne, and Paul Deshusses in the spring semester of 2020.

ICRC and Warfare

This podcast explores the role of the ICRC in warfare while narrowing down on the work the ICRC has done with Landmines over the years. The use of landmines during wars and cases of hostile aggression had become more deadly for civilians than the people for which they were targeted. Hence the ICRC championed a campaign to put a ban on them, this resulted in the Ottawa treaty of 1999. This podcast unpacks the numerous reasons for the eventual sign of the Ottawa treaty that put an end to landmines as weapons of war. It equally touches on the progress of the treaty so far, with particular regard to implementations and stockpile destruction. 

This project was sponsored by the ICRC and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was carried out by Vivian Ejezie and Diandra Dillion in the spring semester of 2020.

CERN

In 2012, CERN – one of the world’s most respected scientific research centers – took a bold step into the world of multilateral diplomacy when it was granted the Observer Status by the United Nations. This podcast explores the journey undertaken by CERN in imagining, achieving, and ultimately becoming a diplomatic voice able to promote science in discussions on the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Benefiting from a variety of interviews with key actors both from the UN and CERN, this story not only tells the tale of how and why CERN developed its diplomatic activities, but it also scrutinizes the crucial role of scientific institutions in multilateral diplomacy today.

This project was sponsored by the CERN and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was produced by Tavo Figueroa, Maëlys Glück, and Luc Poveromo in the Spring semester of 2020.

Feminist History: FIFDH & #MeToo

This first episode of the Feminist History Podcast examines the impact of the #MeToo movement on film festivals, namely the Festival du film et forum international sur les droits humains de Genève (FIFDH). Using FIFDH archives from the past three years, the podcast addresses change over time, the rise of digitisation, and the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on such activist organisations’ abilities to tackle feminist and other pressing issues.

This project was sponsored by the FIFDH and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was produced by Ophélie Schärer and Polly Scholte-Sikorsky in the Spring semester of 2020.

1975 British Referendum over European Membership

Why did Great Britain join the European Community? How did British domestic policy depict, discuss and convey European membership to its citizens? And what were the geopolitical implications of this new supranational relationship? This podcast will answer these questions by shedding light over the complexities and the broad ramifications of a rather marginal event in contemporary historiography: 1975 British Referendum over European Membership.

This project was sponsored by the Foundation Jean Monnet and Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute Geneva. It was produced by Adrian Von Kunheim, Yi Liu and Michele Luppi in the Spring semester of 2020.

RACIAL INJUSTICE AND THE DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD

This discussion focuses on why this situation continues to happen, what is needed to change it, and is this solely about police brutality or is it about human rights?

Mohamed Mahmoud Mohamedou, Professor of International History and Politics and Chair of the International History and Politics Department at the Graduate Institute and Davide Rodogno, Professor of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute, share their thoughts on this volatile situation.

What’s the point of multilateralism? The UN at 75

 

This episode is part of the new podcast series Inside Geneva, produced by SWI swissinfo.ch in partnership with the Graduate Institute and Genève Vision. Today’s special episode entitled “What’s the point of multilateralism: the UN at 75”, focuses on the tensions around the role of the World Health Organization during the coronavirus pandemic.  

This launch programme will look at the highs, and the lows, of the UN over 75 years, and reflect on the UN’s future with, among others, Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, Professor of International History and Politics  and Chair of the Department of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute, and Jasmine Pokuaa Oduro-Bonsrah, master student and former President of the Graduate Institute Student Association (GISA).

THE HISTORICAL IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS

 

The focus of this special series is to discuss what a post-coronavirus world will look like from various points of views. 

This episode focuses on the historical impact of the coronavirus and features Mohamed Mahmoud Mohamedou, Professor of International History and Politics and Chair of the International History and Politics Department at the Graduate Institute; Davide Rodogno, Professor of International History and Politics; and Efrat Gilad, a PhD candidate in International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute.

The interview with Professor Mohamedou is based on an article he recently wrote in the Le Temps about geopolitics in a post-coronavirus world. In his segment, Professor Rodogno shares his thoughts on the overall historical impact of the coronavirus and Efrat Gilad discusses how food production might change as a result of the current pandemic.

Listen to this episode on Spotify or Google Podcasts and be sure to stay tuned for more.

Reflections on our workshop "Sovereignty, Nationalism and Homogeneity"

In the third episode of the Myth of Homogeneity podcast series, Emmanuel Dalle Mulle and Mona Bieling reflect on a workshop their project team organised at the Graduate Institute at the end of February 2020. The workshop was entitled "Sovereignty, Nationalism and Homogeneity in Europe Between the Two World Wars" and brought together scholars from all over the world for two days of presentation and discussions. You can find an overview of the workshop here.

German-German Encounters in Belgium: An exploration of identities across national borders

"German-German Encounters in Belgium: An exploration of identities across national borders" discusses several questions related to national and cultural identity in the context of the German-speaking community in Belgium. During a research trip to the area, Mona Bieling interviewed the director of the Museum Zwischen Venn und Schneifel, to explore more contemporary dimensions of these questions. This podcast is the  second episode of The Myth of Homogeneity Podcast Series.

 

The Ambiguities of Assimilation: Minority-Majority Relations in Italy under Fascism

"The Ambiguities of Assimilation: Minority-Majority Relations in Italy under Fascism", is based on a talk given by Emmanuel Dalle Mulle at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, in March 2019. This podcast is the first episode of The Myth of Homogeneity Podcast Series. "The Myth of Homogeneity: Minority Protection and Assimilation in Western Europe, 1919–1939" is a Swiss National Science-funded research project hosted at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, and run by Davide Rodogno, Emmanuel Dalle Mulle and Mona Bieling. The aim of this research is to acquire a clear and in-depth picture of the history of the relationships between national minorities and majorities in Western Europe during the interwar years through the analysis of patterns of minority protection and/or assimilation. The project entails a multi-layered and multi-archival inquiry focusing on three case-study countries: Belgium, Italy and Spain.

Le Cas François Nivolon

Ce podcast examine Le Cas de François Nivolon, envoyé spécial au Vietnam pour Le Figaro. Les participants à ce podcast sont Andréa Bourgogne, David Rochat et Joseph Roche.  Ce podcast a été produit dans le cadre du Séminaire International de Recherche Appliquée en Histoire (ARS).

 

 

The Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP)

This podcasts delves into how malpractice has led to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the history of its advocacy, and the founding of GARDP in 2016. The participants in this podcast are Michele Zampa, Phasawit Jutatungcharoen, Matteo Bernasconi, and Chaza Al Kanawati. This podcast was produced as part of the International History Applied Research Seminar (ARS).

 

International Labour Organization (ILO)

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the formation of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), this podcasts uncovers the organisations history with German refugees 1933-1939. The participants in this podcast are Kristen Foland-Majkut, Sukanya Sharma, and Francis Watkins. This podcast was produced as part of the International History Applied Research Seminar (ARS).

 

Race and Mobility - Third Space of Exception

In this podcast series, this episode focuses on the third space of exception, which is based on the postcolonial theory of identity.
it was produced as part of the MINT course on 'Race and Mobility' taught by Professor Gopalan Balachandran.

Race and Mobility - Depictions of Immigrants

The second podcast in the series on Race and Mobility explores how immigrants are often depicted through media outlets.

1918 in World History

This podcast discusses aspects of the year 1918 in a broader historical context, with a particular focus on displaced populations and refugees in the wake of the so-called Great War.  The participants in this broadcast are Sara Arab, Bianca Centrone, Paloma Nunez (University of Geneva), Jonathan Leibu, Nicolas Merz and Oliver Rowe. The podcast was produced as part of the International History and Politics course on 'The Evolution of the International System c.1815-Present' taught by Professor Gopalan Balachandran. (Photo credit: Alan Taylor, Folkestone Historical Society)

1989 in World History

This podcast addresses 1989 in a global, historical context to reflect on the role of historians and historical subjects in the telling of recent history. The participants are Amza Adam, Sampierre Gomez, Yasmine Hung and Achim Merlo. The podcast was recorded by students in the International History  and Politics course on 'The Evolution of the International System c.1815-Present'. (Photo credit: picture-alliance/dpa)

Who can be a refugee

This podcast explores the legal framework for refugees and asylum seekers, including their rights and protections, and the former's limitations and implementation at the national and regional levels. The podcast was produced as part of the MINT course on 'Migration, Refugees, Disasporas'.